EP. 28: Interview with Stanley Rosen

Stanley Rosen has worked for the Keyes real estate company for the last ten years. He’s been in customer service solely for the last twenty, starting in the retail industry and moving his way up from the warehouse to a position as the senior regional manager for a company with sixty-seven stores and over seven hundred associates.

Listen below

Although highly successful, Rosen was not a fan of the long hours and working holidays for another company. He saw technology growing and saw the trajectory of the industry and hopped in with both feet in south Florida in 1999.

As he decided on his brokerage, Stanley knew he wanted to align with strength. His biggest question was, “ What make this company a good addition to me?” With that in mind, he selected the Keyes Company because of its status as private and its connections both worldwide and locally.

Rosen took a placement exam with a score leaning fully toward “salesman”, and took that knowledge to transition from ten years evolving into management to real estate sales and the potential roller coaster of commission checks. Knowing he wanted to train under a superstar, he tracked down a top agent and started emulating her every move, from showings to officework.

In Mr. Rosen’s first nine months licensed as an agent, he closed over nine million dollars in an average of $350,000 units. Naturally he was named rookie of the year. The following year he was dubbed the top agent across his brokerage’s offices.

Stanley notes with complete confidence that his “biggest competitor is in the mirror,” and that every day is a new day to shape who wins. In 2003 he hit his breaking point as a solo agent, closing over twenty one million in production by July, working well over fifteen hours a day. Knowing it was time to make a change, he incorporated and brought in an assistant and one agent. He stresses the importance of just bringing in an “agent” as he strongly believes that if a person plans to master an art, he needs to know all sides (including listing and buying as two important skills a single agent should possess).

With new processes in place, his team produced thirty million in 2004 and fifty million in 2005, growing year over year through today. Rosen does not take the credit for any of his business’s growth after incorporation as his own, but humbly lives under the mantra, “nobody works for me, everyone works with me.”

What steps can an agent with this much success offer? Simplified to three parts, Rosen calls his business “relationships, organization and time management, and a pipeline.” Anyone can build a business with those three parts, but the difference between Rosen’s work and others is his attention to people as human beings. He teaches that he’s in the business of customer service and that real estate is a byproduct of that.

Stanley Rosen modestly builds each day on the notion that he is only as good as his last sale, and always plans to be a student of the practice. He understands that in order to win, an agent has to be in the game actively.

The philosophy of sharing comes out as he talks about relationships with other agents as well as mentors. Mentors have the knowledge an agent needs, and other agents have the homes that an agent needs. If an agent considers that their business is built on relationships, it becomes easier to view all interactions as valuable and strive to do the right thing in every situation. Stanley goes on to mention “execution” as part of that. Do what you say you’ll do!

Rosen makes two final remarks about building his business related to his ability to grow and the tools he has tracked down.

Rosen started like any business with just one set of clientele. As he grew his team, he began to address different niches, adding people to his team from all different walks of life to appeal to a growing group of prospective clients. Having all clientele covered as a group is a goal, something to build over time. He notes that as humans they all bring so much to the group and he has found great success growing his team in this way.

In regards to brokerage loyalty, he views each company as providing a box that must be filled. “If you go to the home store and buy the roller and paint and tape and take it home and leave it in the garage, your room will never change colors.” You’ve got to use the tools you’ve been given to get the results that you want.

The best way to reach Stanley is through his email: stanleyrosen@keyes.com

You might be interested in